Exhibition

Infiltrations II

We are being infiltrated!  Come and take a look at the museum from Saturday 13th June 2015 and see if you can find all the collection-inspired works by local artists secreted throughout the galleries.

infiltrations poster A4 landscape

Advertisements

Billy Connell’s War begins

 

Director Eric Dorfman welcomes the audience

Director Eric Dorfman welcomes the audience

Mayor Annette Main opens the exhibition

Mayor Annette Main opens the exhibition

Last Friday saw the opening of our exhibition for the centenary of the first world war, Billy Connell’s War – Whanganui in World War I.  There was a great turn-out with 100 people in attendance and the show was well received.  A welcome by the Director Eric Dorfman was followed by a speech and formal opening by Mayor Annette Main before the crowd moved into the exhibition space for the karakia by our local kaumātua and a preview of the show.

Kirsty Ross delivers her speech, accompanied by some images of soldiers

Kirsty Ross delivers her speech, accompanied by some images of soldiers

Guests were then given a brown paper bag afternoon tea (cheese or corned beef sandwiches, fruit cake and an Anzac biscuit) and Kirtsy Ross, Curator of 20th Century History at Te Papa, regaled the audience with a talk on her research into New Zealand’s first world war experience and the intricacies (and humours!) of passing on such a legacy.

 

 

Guests view some of Billy's photographa

Guests view some of Billy’s photographa

Guests view some of the artifacts on display

Guests view some of the artifacts on display

Guests collect their afternoon tea

Guests collect their afternoon tea

 

 

The exhibition tells the story of Billy Connell, a local man who enlisted and served in the first world war.  Billy Connell was born in Palmerston North in 1993, the son of William and Naomi Connell. William was a carpenter in Palmerston North and later in Marton. By 1911 Naomi Connell had separated from her husband and was living in Durie Terrace in Wanganui, later moving to May Street.  On 5 August 1914 New Zealand declared war on Germany in support of Great Britain Billy Connell enlisted and went off to war with the Main Body of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force.  He had a camera in his kitbag and took photographs while on service, often illegally. Servicemen were not permitted to take photographs or write about campaigns or battles in case information fell into the hands of the enemy. His images tell the story of an ordinary serviceman during extraordinary times. The photographs were arranged into seven albums. Billy’s sister Mrs Amelia McCullum donated them to the Whanganui Regional Museum in 1966.

BCW box logo

Billy Connell’s War is open until September 2016 so come in and follow Billy’s journey through the war.  The Museum is free entry.

House of Bones revisited… again and again and again

HOB10I work as a Museum educator. The other day I hosted a small group of Year 12 girls (around about 16 years old) who visited the Museum with their art teacher to draw the African masks and statues in Minkisi. The students worked really well and made some amazing drawings.
At the end, their teacher gave them a reminder that there was just 5 minutes to go before they had to leave for school. A couple of the girls asked, “Can we go down to the House of Bones?” When he said yes, a small group of them RAN down the stairs, squealing with delight. What was so fascinating to them?
HOB14The House of Bones is set up as a 1930s era house of a professor who collects bones, and fills his house with them. There are animal skulls in the bookcases; crates of bones in the hallway that seem recently delivered, but not yet unpacked; an office with old oak desk, typewriter and assorted handwritten letters and notes; and a newspaper lined attic with chests of bones for hands-on investigation.
HOB31Why did this excite the teenagers? Possibly because it is a little bit dark, a little bit weird, and a sound-track of strange creaks, scrapes and footsteps makes the “house” feel a little bit creepy.
It is interesting that after being up for just two months, with lots of different activities for children to do, there are some local children who have already visited House of Bones so often that they have completed all the existing activities, and are asking for new challenges. Although I’m not surprised that children are interested in the bones and want to come and see them, I would never have guessed it would attract so much repeat visitation from both children and teenagers.HOB24
I think it shows that the way that we design exhibitions can make an enormous difference to the way people respond to museum objects and collections.

Margie Beautrais is an Educator at Whanganui Regional Museum