Taonga Maori

Mako and Tuatara

Mako and Tuatara is a traditional Māori story, retold by Lisa Reweti especially  for children. Hear it on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_GnzKng3fI

Mako Tuatara and Lisa with Sunfish

Once upon a time, a long long time ago, in the depths of the ocean there lived two ENORMOUS creatures. One was a shark called Mako. He was bigger than the biggest megalodon. The other was a GINORMOUS lizard called Tuatara, who was even bigger than a brontosaurus!

They were the very best of friends. They did everything together. Their favourite thing to do was to eat. They loved eating! The more they ate the bigger they grew. The bigger they grew, the more they ate!

All of the other animals were starving.They moaned to Tangaroa, “Mako and Tuatara are eating everything!  There is no kai left for the rest of us! Can you please talk to them and sort something out?”

So Tangaroa, the guardian of the ocean, went and spoke to Mako and Tuatara.

“It is not sustainable to have both of you in the ocean,” he boomed. “There is not enough kai for everyone. One of you must go and live on land.”

Straight away Mako put up his fin.“I will go and live on land” he said. “I will be the very first forest dwelling, tree climbing shark.”

He showed Tangaroa and Tuatara what he would look like climbing a tree. He looked ridiculous.

“You look ridiculous,” said Tuatara. “I am a lizard. I have legs and I can walk. I’ll go and live on the land.”

“But I will never see you again!” wailed Mako.

“Perhaps I can find a way, where we can still talk to each other,” said Tuatara.

Mako and Tuatara said their farewells. It was very sad. They had an awkward hug. Then with a flick of his tail Mako turned and swam out into the deep sea.

Tuatara headed for the beach but when he came up and out of the water something magical happened. He began to shrink. He grew smaller and smaller and smaller, until he became the size that he is now.

Some people believe that Mako and Tuatara use the pūtātara to talk to one another……….but that is another story.

 

Retold by Lisa Reweti

Whanganui Regional Museum Programmes Presenter

 

Reunited with the bones of their ancestors

Over the last few years the Whanganui Regional Museum has been working on repatriating the human remains in the collection.  After extensive research and testing, these tūpuna are finally being sent home to rest.

Check out the last repatriation here:

https://www.maoritelevision.com/news/latest-news/re-united-bones-their-ancestors

 

Hōne Heke and the Flagpole

Getting close and personal with taonga (treasures) that speak of people and nations is one of the many things that make working at the Whanganui Regional Museum special. It would be easy to write a sexy piece about something elaborate or breath-taking, but I have chosen a very unassuming chunk of a painted wooden pole.

1. Flagpole

“Part of a flagpole”; one, in fact, cut down by Hone Heke. Ref: TH.1321

The label simply reads “TH.1231. Part of a flagpole”. Some pretty intense research, however, has revealed an amazing story. This 50cm length of flagpole is an important part of Aotearoa history; it is a section of the fourth flagstaff that the legendary Hōne Heke chopped down.

At school we were taught about this “troublemaker”, the flagpole-felling rebel who was finally subdued by Governor George Grey. But there is more to Hōne Heke than meets the eye.

Hōne Wiremu Heke Pōkai was a great rangatira (chief) and war strategist from Ngā Puhi, who was the first to sign Te Tiriti o Waitangi. After Māori leaders of The United Tribes signed the Declaration of Independence on 28 October 1835 and declared their sovereignty, Hōne gifted a flagstaff to Kororāreka (Russell) so that the United Tribes flag could be flown.

In 1836 King William IV sanctioned The United Tribes Declaration and the flag, making it our nation’s first official flag. Used until 1902, this flag featured on the medals presented to soldiers who served in the South African War (1899–1902).

2. First NZ flag

 The first NZ flag, sanctioned by King William IV in 1836 and used until 1900, was chosen by Māori of the United Tribes who signed the Declaration of Independence on 28 October 1835.
Source: www.mch.govt.nz, the website of Manatū Taonga-Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Licensed by Manatū Taonga-Ministry for Culture and Heritage for re-use under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial 3.0 New Zealand License.

After the signing of the Tiriti o Waitangi, Governor Hobson had the United Tribes flag removed from the flagstaff and flew the British flag there. Hōne Heke saw this as a rejection of the equal status of Māori with the government. He wished to show his objection without hurting or alarming settlers so cut his flagstaff down on 8 July 1844, and wrote to the new Governor Fitzroy on 19 June:

 Friend Governor… I am thinking of leaving off my rude conduct towards the Europeans. Now I say that I will prepare another pole … in order to put an end to our present quarrel. … The pole that was cut down belonged to me, I made it for the native flag, and it was never paid for by the Europeans.

The flagstaff was replaced and the British flag re-flown, increasing Māori disquiet. Hōne cut down replacement flagstaffs on 10 January and 18 January 1845. A military presence was established in Kororāreka in February and Governor Fitzroy posted a £100 reward for the arrest of Hōne Heke. It is rumoured that Heke responded by offering a £100 reward for the governor’s head!

On 30 December 1897 the Wanganui Chronicle published a letter by Samuel Drew, our Museum founder, stating that James J Clendon Esq, RM, sent him the piece of flagpole and “vouched” its authenticity. Clendon was a ship owner and captain before settling in Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands) in 1832. A successful merchant, farmer, JP, Police Magistrate, and eventually Magistrate of the Court, he collected the pole whilst holding the position of Police Magistrate. The article reads:

… the last chopping down of this staff that was the starting point of that Hone Heke war which proved so disastrous to our troops. …  He considered that while the British flag was floating there the Pakeha would acquire Maori land and with it a power that would oust the Maori, much in the same way as the white people were doing in Van Dieman’s Land and Australia …

Drew continued:

… to prevent any more chopping iron plates were fastened round its base, and a block house built round it so that the staff came through the centre of the roof. This time it was left unmolested until March 11th, 1845, when in the first grey of the morning an attack was made. … The strong iron casing on the flagstaff did not protect it for the Maoris quickly dug below the iron and soon chopped it through. Here it fell and lay on the ground for many years. … Our soldiers were afterwards sent several times to chastise Heke. He was a noble old warrior and fought well, and was never beaten, but our troops suffered severely in the assaults on their strong pahs.

This plain, humble piece of wood is the essence of our nation’s history.

 

Āwhina Twomey is Kaitiaki Taonga Māori and Kaiwhakaako at Whanganui Regional Museum.

Pūoro Karetao – Musical Puppet Show

Karetao

Nau mai ki te Whare Tāpere! We are fortunate to be able to bring you James Webster and his team, who will have you mesmerised throughout their stage production. Let them introduce you to karetao (puppets) which are also pūoro (instruments). A true tohunga (expert), James has carefully carved the exquisite cast, and when these pūoro karetao sing – you don’t want to miss it.

In June our Pūoro Karetao show was postponed due to the flood. We are pleased to announce that we have secured another date with James Webster to showcase these wonderful taonga, next Monday Aug 10th in our Davis Theatre.

The two school sessions at 10.30-11.30am and 1-2pm are almost booked out, so reply now to awhinat@wrm.org.nz to secure a seat for your students and enquire about the school rates.

There is ONLY evening show from 6.30 – 7.30pm. Ring 349 1110 or email info@wrm.org.nz now to find out more.