Kate Sheppard

Cycling Ladies

The development of new technology often brings about the greatest changes in fashion. In the 1890s, the introduction of the bicycle led to significant changes in women’s fashion. Prior to this decade, women had always worn skirts or dresses whose design followed strict rules regarding appropriateness and modesty, and which were often very heavy and restricting.

Many women wanted to ride bicycles but this was considered unsuitable. While it was acceptable for women to ride side-saddle on a horse, riding a bicycle was deemed almost indecent, certainly shocking!

3. Lady on bike

Illustration of a woman cyclist wearing a tailored jacket and split skirt, 1894.  Ladies Standard Magazine, April 1894.

The first women to ride bicycles in New Zealand were twins Bertha and Blanche Thompson who in 1892, along with several other young adventurous women, formed the Atlanta Cycling Club, especially for women, in Christchurch. Suffrage leader Kate Sheppard, then in her forties, became a member and she and Bertha also served on the ACC committee. Christchurch did not view the ACC with approval; at times, the twins’ older brothers had to accompany the women cyclists to ward off stone-throwing spectators.

Women in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries wore very long skirts, which were not only difficult, but dangerous to wear while cycling. Many early lady cyclists had bad accidents when the hems of their skirts caught in the bicycle chain. A solution had to be found. Since decency, at that time, dictated that a woman’s legs had to be covered, many cyclists adopted a split-skirt. This was an adaptation of a garment designed by Mrs Amelia Bloomer, one of the pioneers of the Dress Reform Movement, in the mid nineteenth century. Mrs Bloomer was ridiculed when she and other women attempted to introduce healthier and more practical styles of clothing for women such as knickerbockers, or bloomers, for women engaged in active pastimes.

2. Split skirt

Split skirt from the cycling costume.  Ref: 1973.88b

The split skirt gradually became acceptable as a cycling garment because it was designed to look like a regular skirt. The split skirt was further adapted over time. Later versions began to resemble trousers, never worn by European women before.

1. Cycling costume

Lady’s cycling costume, 1890s. Ref: 1973.88

The Museum has in its collection a wonderful woman’s cycling costume, made in the 1890s. It is a smart and practical outfit for the new activity of cycling. The costume comprises a tailored jacket and divided cycling skirt, both made of dark charcoal wool twill, fully lined with heavy black silk. The costume was professionally fitted and sewn; there is no maker’s mark in either the jacket or the skirt. It’s in excellent condition; perhaps it wasn’t used very much.

 

By Libby Sharpe, Senior Curator at Whanganui Regional Museum.

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The Women’s Christian Temperance Union

This pledge card from the Dalchild-Matarawa Band of Hope Society belonged to Estella M Cook, and bound her to the principles of temperance. The pledge reads "This is to certify that Estella M Cook is a member of the above society having signed the following pledge - I hereby agree that I will abstain from all intoxicating liquors as beverages, that I will not offer them to others, and that I will in all suitable ways discountenance their use in the community."  Signed by J Welch, May 10, 1900. (2004.112.6)

This pledge card from the Dalchild-Matarawa Band of Hope Society belonged to Estella M Cook, and bound her to the principles of temperance. The pledge reads “This is to certify that Estella M Cook is a member of the above society having signed the following pledge – I hereby agree that I will abstain from all intoxicating liquors as beverages, that I will not offer them to others, and that I will in all suitable ways discountenance their use in the community.” Signed by J Welch, May 10, 1900. (2004.112.6)

The temperance movement had roots in Britain and the United States in the early 19th century, where reformers identified alcohol as the root of evil in society, engendering poverty, bad health, brutality,  (especially towards women and children) and immorality. Temperance movements were mainly led by churches and encompassed all classes and all denominations.

The Women’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) was established in New Zealand in 1885 in response to a great social problem of the time, the “demon drink” that had migrated with colonial settlers. The Union’s primary aim was to eradicate harmful alcohol, but it also encompassed wider areas of concern. The WCTU was redefining a complete social and moral environment. It sought to promote wider social reform by influencing legislative activity, and its major campaign, therefore, centred on gaining the vote for women.

This plate has a coloured transfer print of a scene where a man is about to hit a woman who has a baby in her arms while two children try to stop him. A second woman watches from a doorway. Printed on the plate around the scene is "THE BOTTLE / PLATE VI - FEARFUL QUARRELS AND BRUTAL VIOLENCE / ARE THE NATURAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE FREQUENT USE OF THE BOTTLE". (TH1029)

This plate has a coloured transfer print of a scene where a man is about to hit a woman who has a baby in her arms while two children try to stop him. A second woman watches from a doorway. Printed on the plate around the scene is “THE BOTTLE / PLATE VI – FEARFUL QUARRELS AND BRUTAL VIOLENCE / ARE THE NATURAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE FREQUENT USE OF THE BOTTLE”. (TH1029)

On 5 October 1885 women in Wanganui met to hear an address by the American feminist, Mary Leavitt. She had come to New Zealand on a lecture tour for the Women’s Christian Temperance Movement, which had just been formed in the United States of America. At the conclusion of the meeting those present decided to form a branch in Wanganui. By February 1886 there were 15 branches throughout New Zealand. Membership required the signing of a pledge to “abstain from all intoxicating liquors”.

Members were never questioned about their practice of Christianity. At the time, adherence to Christianity was seen as a given, the norm. The national WCTU suffrage leader, Kate Sheppard, wrote “We are perfectly sure that if our Lord Jesus Christ were here he would not hinder one of His followers from engaging in temperance, or any other good work, because of an error in the theology”.

Margaret Bullock’s knowledge of the parliamentary system helped push the passage of the 1893 Electoral Bill by warning leading New Zealand suffragist and Women’s Christian Temperance Union advocate Kate Sheppard, of possible obstruction. The original is from the Kate Sheppard Papers at Canterbury Museum. The telegram reads "Mrs Sheppard, Box 209 Chch / Electoral Bill returned House for strangulation ostensibly amendment wire Premier instantly / M Bullock / Wellington". (1805.417)

Margaret Bullock’s knowledge of the parliamentary system helped push the passage of the 1893 Electoral Bill by warning leading New Zealand suffragist and Women’s Christian Temperance Union advocate Kate Sheppard, of possible obstruction. The original is from the Kate Sheppard Papers at Canterbury Museum. The telegram reads “Mrs Sheppard, Box 209 Chch / Electoral Bill returned House for strangulation ostensibly amendment wire Premier instantly / M Bullock / Wellington”. (1805.417)

At its first annual convention in Wellington in 1886, the WCTU resolved to work for women’s suffrage. Kate Sheppard, who was to become the leading face of Women’s Suffrage, was appointed national superintendent of the franchise and legislation department of the WCTU. In 1891 she began editing a women’s page in the temperance newspaper, the Prohibitionist, to promote votes for women.

The Wanganui branch of the WCTU had been formed and led by Mrs A Dudley Ward, the President of the new national Union. Thirty- three working and fifteen honorary members were enrolled on 5 October 1885. The Wanganui branch demonstrated vigorous temperance activity, but a lesser degree of political agitation for other social reform, and minimal concern with women’s issues. Throughout the suffrage period the local WCTU seemed to react to directives from the national executive, rather than initiate activity at a local level.

The Criterion Hotel was originally built as a Coffee House, or a Temperance Hotel. It’s interesting to see a line-up of cars outside the hotel – was drinking and driving a standard practice in the 1930s?  Photograph by FH Bethwaite. (2005.56.11)

The Criterion Hotel was originally built as a Coffee House, or a Temperance Hotel. It’s interesting to see a line-up of cars outside the hotel – was drinking and driving a standard practice in the 1930s? Photograph by FH Bethwaite. (2005.56.11)

The Wanganui branch disbanded a year later and formed itself into a “sisterhood” through which members thought they could better meet the requirements of their district. While the early Wanganui Branch of the WCTU was believed to have supported women’s franchise, after disbanding its main focus was still temperance activity.

Individualism was a feature of the movement in general, particularly in terms of the moral choice a vote provided when selecting a candidate to support. This decision took the form of scrutinising the moral standards of candidates, rather than their political views and allegiances. Women of the WCTU believed social change did not involve a transfer of power from one group to another, but came from the changed consciousness of a morally transformed individual. Such a viewpoint put less emphasis on the formal structure of the law, which may have influenced the tendency away from political agitation for other social reform.

A ceramic plate from a series of temperance plates has a coloured transfer print of a street scene of a woman and two children begging outside a public house. Printed on the plate around the scene is "THE BOTTLE / PLATE IV - UNABLE TO OBTAIN EMPLOYMENT / THEY ARE DRIVEN BY POVERTYINTO THE STREETS TO BEG / AND BY THIS MEANS THEY STILL SUPPLY THE BOTTLE". (TH1030)

A ceramic plate from a series of temperance plates has a coloured transfer print of a street scene of a woman and two children begging outside a public house. Printed on the plate around the scene is “THE BOTTLE / PLATE IV – UNABLE TO OBTAIN EMPLOYMENT / THEY ARE DRIVEN BY POVERTYINTO THE STREETS TO BEG / AND BY THIS MEANS THEY STILL SUPPLY THE BOTTLE”. (TH1030)

This Order of the Sons of Temperance medal was awarded to Arthur George Jarvis of Wanganui. (1993.18.2)

This Order of the Sons of Temperance medal was awarded to Arthur George Jarvis of Wanganui. (1993.18.2)

In Wanganui agitation for legislation was absent except for the general directive that members conscientiously use their vote to support the candidate with the “highest principles and who would advance the best interests of the community”. The Wanganui branch re-formed years after it disbanded, in 1896, three years after women’s enfranchisement. Membership increased to reach a peak of forty-nine in 1901; numbers then started to decline.

The first Franchise Leagues, the organisations that drove the movement of votes for women, were formed in New Zealand’s main centres by the WCTU when it appeared that the 1892 Franchise Bill was in danger of being lost. In these organisations, WCTU leaders joined with non-temperance feminists in a WCTU-initiated group. The WCTU and the Leagues aimed to educate women to a sense of their responsibilities and obtain signatures for the petition to parliament.

In Wanganui, however, the League was not WCTU-initiated. Women present at the inaugural meeting of the Wanganui Franchise League in June 1893 merely confirmed “women’s right to electoral privileges and the capacity to judiciously use them”, as quoted in The Prohibitionist of 3 June 1893.