museum collection

The Passenger Pigeon

In the 1870s, passenger pigeons were still forming a “feathered river across the sky”, but by the end of the decade their numbers had crashed.  Smith Bennett, Wood engraving from original sketch

In the 1870s, passenger pigeons were still forming a “feathered river across the sky”, but by the end of the decade their numbers had crashed.
Smith Bennett, Wood engraving from original sketch

The passenger pigeon (Extopistes migratorius) was once the most abundant bird on Earth. Flocks of millions of birds darkened the skies of North America, and took days to pass overhead. When they descended on a forest they would strip it bare of nuts and acorns, break branches with their sheer numbers, and carpet the ground with droppings, which eyewitnesses said “fell like snow”. People firing randomly with shotguns or waving sticks would knock down dozens, to be packed and shipped east as cheap food. Yet, incredibly, by the end of the 19th century, the birds had almost disappeared.

Martha died on 1 September 1914, aged probably 29, in Cincinnati Zoo. She was the last survivor of a small flock that the zoo had been unsuccessfully trying to breed in captivity.

Martha was the last survivor of a small flock that the zoo had been unsuccessfully trying to breed in captivity.

This specimen was given to Samuel Drew, the founder of the Museum, by the German naturalist Otto Finsch in the late 19th century.

This specimen was given to Samuel Drew, the founder of the Museum, by the German naturalist Otto Finsch in the late 19th century.

The last passenger pigeon, named Martha, died in Cincinnati Zoo in 1914. Her body was immediately frozen in a block of ice and sent to the Smithsonian Institute. Other museums had been collecting specimens as the pigeons approached extinction; there are about 1500 in museum collections around the world, including three in the Whanganui Regional Museum. But it wasn’t collectors or even hunters that ultimately wiped out the passenger pigeon, although they were hunted in staggering quantities, but forest clearance. The birds relied on huge forests of nuts to maintain their enormous flocks, and they needed to breed in enormous communal colonies. Once enough forest had been cleared for agriculture, flocks dropped below a critical threshold for breeding, and during the 1870s the population crashed. Past this point, they were doomed as a species, though a few persisted into the 20th century.

 

 

These mounted male and female passenger pigeons show off the male’s pale cinnamon breast feathers. Whoever mounted these birds gave them yellow eyes, but those were red in life.

These mounted male and female passenger pigeons show off the male’s pale cinnamon breast feathers. Whoever mounted these birds gave them yellow eyes, but those were red in life.

John James Audubon, the French-American naturalist and artist, included this pair of passenger pigeons in his masterpiece Birds of America, published in a series between 1827 and 1838. He recalled seeing an enormous flock of several billion birds in 1813 that took three days to pass overhead.

John James Audubon, the French-American naturalist and artist, included this pair of passenger pigeons in his masterpiece Birds of America, published in a series between 1827 and 1838. He recalled seeing an enormous flock of several billion birds in 1813 that took three days to pass overhead.

Recently, researchers examining passenger pigeon DNA were surprised to find that despite their abundance the birds had quite low genetic diversity, suggesting that their population had only recently exploded when European settlers encountered them. The best explanation is that pigeon numbers went through periodic booms and busts, in response to regular fluctuations in the availability of nuts and acorns, which occasionally have super-abundant “mast” years. Pigeons had evolved to seek out heavy nut crops and rapidly increase their numbers to exploit them. When Native Americans were devastated by disease following colonisation, they stopped hunting pigeons and collecting nuts, and passenger pigeons quickly increased to enormous numbers. Their population was going through a natural downturn at exactly the time European forest clearance and hunting began to increase, and those combined forces were enough to push them into a death spiral.

To estimate pigeon genetic diversity for this study, the researchers needed DNA, which is hard to get from a species extinct for 100 years. They turned to museum specimens, and were able to take tissue scraped from the toe pads of passenger pigeon skins and use recently-developed technology to extract fragments of DNA and reconstruct long sequences of the bird’s genome. This ability to recover ancient DNA has made museum collections valuable in a new and unexpected way: from them we’ve learned that female moa were twice the size of males, that the kiwi and the Madagascar elephant bird are close relatives, and, now, why the passenger pigeon went extinct so rapidly. Even if they died over a century ago, museum specimens can, in a small way, live again.

Paraphernalia confined to the Past

SMOKIN': Kathy Greensides displays the array of smoking utensils at the museum

SMOKIN’: Kathy Greensides displays the array of smoking utensils at the museum

Once again, the intrepid Midweek reporter delves into the dark underbelly of the Whanganui Regional Museum, this time with Kathy Greensides, collections assistant and photographer. There, on an archival table, she had arranged a collection of archaic smoking paraphernalia.
“I’ve pulled out a bunch of smoking related items, which are interesting,” she says, “old tobacco tins, matches, lighters, opium pipes … interesting pipes, and this tobacco tin that George V sent out to all his troops at the request of Princess Mary.” She asked that all soldiers and sailors serving in the war (World War 1) receive a Christmas gift from their sovereign. The gift consisted of the tin, tobacco, confectionery, spices, pencils, a picture of the Princess Mary, a Christmas card and a message from the King: “The Queen and I wish you Godspeed and a safe return to your homes and dear ones. A grateful Mother Country is proud of your splendid services characterised by unsurpassed devotion and courage.”
Three intricately carved pipes are part of the haul Kathy brought out; one, in the form of a Biblical prophet; one, a carved skull; the other a fully carved Maori head. Seeing these items, some now obsolete, brought home the fact that smoking utensils of any kind will, one day, belong only in a museum, and smoking as a concept will be relegated to an unfortunate past. People of the future will marvel at the whole idea of setting leaves on fire and inhaling the smoke.
So, why did Kathy choose these items for her Vaults story? “It’s dying out; you don’t see these things any more, so when I saw them it sparked my interest. And in looking into the history of the [soldiers’] tin, I thought it was kind of touching.” Kathy is not now, nor has ever been a smoker, so for her this was a peek into a foreign lifestyle.
Among the smoking treasures is a Vesta match tin with matches still inside. Although there was a piece of abrasive material attached to the tin, it was generally accepted that these wax matches would strike on almost any surface (including facial stubble).
The opium pipes are of bamboo, but are missing some of their smaller pieces such as the ceramic bowls in which the drug was placed to burn.
Little is known of the provenance of these items, but they are intrinsically interesting. The tobacco tins, designed to be displayed with their creative pictures and slogans, promoting the superior lifestyle of the smoker and suggesting success, good looks, wealth … all can be yours if you smoke this brand of tobacco. Words like “cool” and “satisfying” were standard in tobacco advertising, the very notion of which has already been put into a box labelled “obsolete”.
Interesting that this legacy of Sir Walter Raleigh lasted as long as it has, but its future belongs in a place like the Whanganui Regional Museum.

Original article by Paul Brooks appeared in ‘The Wangnaui Midweek’ on 13th February 2013.  Reproduced with permission from the author.